What Andrew Carnegie’s Autobiography Teaches Us About the Historical Figures of the 19th Century

What Andrew Carnegie’s Autobiography Teaches Us About the Historical Figures of the 19th Century

Andrew Carnegie’s autobiography provides a wonderful look into the history of the 1800’s. In particular, we get first-hand accounts on the famous people from that time. Carnegie was the richest man of the 1800’s, and this wealth gained him access to the prominent figures of the century.

Below are a few excerpts from his autobiography:

On Abraham Lincoln:

All the pictures of this extraordinary man are like him. He was so marked of feature that it was impossible for any one to paint him and not produce a likeness. He was certainly one of the most homely men I ever saw when his features were in repose; but when excited or telling a story, intellect shone through his eyes and illuminated his face to a degree which I have seldom or never seen in any other.

His manners were perfect because natural; and he had a kind word for everybody, even the youngest boy in the office. His attentions were not graduated. They were the same to all, as deferential in talking to the messenger boy as to Secretary Seward. His charm lay in the total absence of manner. It was not so much, perhaps, what he said as the way in which he said it that never failed to win one. I have often regretted that I did not note down carefully at the time some of his curious sayings, for he said even common things in an original way. I never met a great man who so thoroughly made himself one with all men as Mr. Lincoln.

On Ulysses S. Grant:

I never heard Grant use a long or grand word, or make any attempt at “manner,” but the general impression that he was always reticent is a mistake. He was a surprisingly good talker sometimes and upon occasion liked to talk. His sentences were always short and to the point, and his observations upon things remarkably shrewd. When he had nothing to say he said nothing. I noticed that he was never tired of praising his subordinates in the war. He spoke of them as a fond father speaks of his children.

On Mark Twain:

He had a heroine in his wife. She it was who sustained him and traveled the world round with him as his guardian angel, and enabled him to conquer as Sir Walter did. This he never failed to tell to his intimates.

Never in my life did three words leave so keen a pang as those uttered upon my first call after Mrs. Clemens passed away. I fortunately found him alone and while my hand was still in his, and before one word had been spoken by either, there came from him, with a stronger pressure of my hand, these words: “A ruined home, a ruined home.” The silence was unbroken. I write this years after, but still I hear the words again and my heart responds.

On Booker Washington:

My connection with Hampton and Tuskegee Institutes, which promote the elevation of the colored race we formerly kept in slavery, has been a source of satisfaction and pleasure, and to know Booker Washington is a rare privilege. We should all take our hats off to the man who not only raised himself from slavery, but helped raise millions of his race to a higher stage of civilization.

On Matthew Arnold:

The most charming man, John Morley and I agree, that we ever knew was Matthew Arnold. He had, indeed, “a charm”—that is the only word which expresses the effect of his presence and his conversation. Even his look and grave silences charmed.

Arnold visited us in Scotland in 1887, and talking one day of sport he said he did not shoot, he could not kill anything that had wings and could soar in the clear blue sky; but, he added, he could not give up fishing—”the accessories are so delightful.”

I am really enjoying this book. We read so many secondary sources of the 1800’s that the time period has been clouded with commentary. So when we read a primary source like Carnegie, it’s refreshing. We see that the GREAT MEN of history we’re thoroughly human, striving to climb the ladder of success in their own lives.

See Related Article: On the Importance of a Trifle: (Great Wisdom from Andrew Carnegie)

On the Importance of a Trifle (Great Wisdom From Andrew Carnegie)

On the Importance of a Trifle (Great Wisdom From Andrew Carnegie)

Here is excellent excerpt from The Autobiography of Andrew Carnegie. He mentions the moment when he was given an opportunity to work for the railroad company; he would later, of course, become the one of the richest men in history:

Upon such trifles do the most momentous consequences hang. A word, a look, an accent, may affect the destiny not only of individuals, but of nations. He is a bold man who calls anything a trifle…The young should remember that upon trifles the best gifts of the gods often hang.

Touche.

There are no ordinary moments. Every minute is a chance for you to smash the life game to pieces. Every second is a chance for you to ascend the mountain of greatness, taking your rightful place among the GREAT MEN OF HISTORY.

As an aside…we should be reading the biographies of GREAT MEN. Enough with Kafka turning into an insect, or other such rubbish. You have a soul that needs filling and it cannot be wasted on the half-men of history.

There are no trifles…every moment is magic and is an opportunity for you to explode with passionate fury.

See Related Article: On the Dangers of Sophistry

Can People Change?

Can People Change?

I am afraid not.

You either have a burning desire to be great or you don’t You can either accept the ugliest truth or you can’t. You’re willing to fight back against the forces of Satanism, or you’re too weak to lift a finger. It’s one of the other and there is no room in between.

Look at yourself in the mirror. Are you capable of changing? If you are, then a relentless fire is burning inside of you. You refuse to accept defeat. You refuse to let the destroyers of life take a victory. You are RA, Apolla, Zeus…reincarnated in the flesh.

Tonight we ride!

Resolutions Must Have a Red-Pill Reality

Resolutions Must Have a Red-Pill Reality

This is the time when we get the obligatory optimism. We see people posting “Merry Christmas” and “Happy Holidays.” We see that social media is littered with a variety of “Don’t Stop Believing” quotes. And we get the typical resolutions and “you can do it” replies of encouragement.

And yet…

None of this can become a reality without a red-pill perspective (perhaps even a black pill). To make any change, you’ll have to swallow an unpleasant truth. You’ll have to spar with a bevy of lies that stand before you. You’ll have to discern the charlatans from the genuine thought leaders.

This will be painful…and most people are unwilling to accept the darkest of realities.

Resolutions must have a red pill reality. Otherwise, the words we speak during the holidays are nothing but empty platitudes.

See Related Article:  The Nice Man is Not a Great Man

On the Duplicity and Degeneracy of the Movie “Flashdance”

On the Duplicity and Degeneracy of the Movie “Flashdance”

Yesterday, the Major saw the movie Flashdance againI grew up in the 1980s, so I saw the picture when I was a hapless beta-male. Like so many modern films, the movie fails in hindsight. We realize that we were infected by a piece of degenerate art. Let’s start from the top, shall we?

Point #1 – Alexandra “Alex” Owens (Jennifer Beals) is an eighteen-year-old welder at a steel mill in Pittsburgh.

  • Bullshit! How many women do you know that are professional welders?    Moreover, if you do find one, what are the chances that she’s 18 and attractive?

Point #2 – Alex works as a stripper at night. One evening, she catches the eye of customer Nick Hurley, the owner of the steel mill where she works. After learning that Alex is one of his employees, Nick begins to pursue her on the job.

  • Bullshit again. If you were a rich Alpha male, why would you pursue a stripper?

Point #3 – Throughout the film, Alex is basically a bitch to Nick. And yet, he cannot seem to get enough of her emasculating ways. Every sarcastic comment draws him in. Every angry scowl on her face deepens his love.

  • Three strikes of bullshit…you’re out! What rich man is going to accept being perpetually denigrated by an 18-year old stripper with a malicious attitude?

The movie presents a dangerous message to both men and women. It teaches young men that it’s ok to “save” a stripper – would you instill that lesson in your son? And it teaches young women that an Alpha male will overlook their promiscuous transgressions and provide them with a life of luxury – would you instill that lesson in your daughter?

Never forget, my dear reader…the GREAT EMPIRE must have GREAT ARTWORKS by GREAT MEN. These ARTWORKS must promote a UNIVERSAL LIFE ESSENCE and HUMAN BEAUTY. We cannot accept the broken morality of degenerate art.

Two roads diverge in the woods…you can choose the Cleaver family or gay wedding cakes. There is no in between.

See Related Story: The Karate Kid Was a Piece of Anti-American Propaganda

An Analysis of Henry Ford (How His Father Almost Killed His Dream)

An Analysis of Henry Ford (How His Father Almost Killed His Dream)

From Henry Ford’s autobiography, My Life and Work:

My father offered me forty acres of timber land, provided I gave up being a machinist.

What would have happened if Ford had followed his father’s advice? What if he gave up his love for automobiles to pursue a life as a farmer? The answer is simple…there would be no Ford Motor Company.

Your dreams can be stymied in a variety of ways; sadly, parents can be the culprit in this regard. Instead of analyzing the talents of a child and promoting them, they will often discourage the developments of their son/daughter.

See Related Article: Book Review: Basic Economics by Thomas Sowell

Six Interesting Quotes From “The Maxims of George Washington”

Six Interesting Quotes From “The Maxims of George Washington”

I finished reading The Maxims of George Washington awhile back. It’s a collection of insights from America’s first president. The book was fascinating, since so much is said about the man. And yet, we’ve rarely heard anything from the man.

Below are six interesting quotes from the book:

On the Native Americans (Indian Nations):

“The basis of our proceedings with the Indian Nations has been, and shall be, JUSTICE, during the period in which I have anything to do with the administration of this government” (p. 204)

On friendship:

“The company in which you will improve most will be the least expensive to you.” (263).

“Assimilate with men of good quality, if you esteem your own reputation; for it is better to be alone than in bad company.” (264)

On his feelings towards Great Britain:

I was opposed to the policy of Great Britain, and became an enemy of her measures; but I always distinguish between a cause and individuals…personally I could never be an enemy to them.”(p. 265).

On slavery:

“There is not a man living, who wishes more sincerely than I do, to see a plan adopted, for the abolition of it [slavery]. But there is only one proper and effectual mode by which it can be accomplished, and that is, by legislative authority.”

Your [Lafayette’s] purchase of an estate in Cayenne, with a view of emancipating the slaves on it, is a generous and noble proof of your humanity” (p. 276).

On gambling:

“Avoid gaming. This is a vice that is productive of every possible evil” (331)

Primary sources are better than secondary ones. Therefore, it should be the goal of every honest man to judge others by their actual words…as opposed to what others have said about them.

See Related Article: You Should Preference the Man That Retains a Vital Force