These were the words of Guy De Maupassant, the legendary French writer. I am currently reading a wonderful collection of his work, entitled Complete Original Short Stories of Guy De Maupassant. It’s filled with stories that demonstrate his greatness. Works of art that stand like a testament to his brilliance.

“I entered literary life as a meteor…”

These words might shock the common man. How vain, how conceited, how full of himself! This reaction is the response of a dullard. The irrelevant clerk. The quiet commoner. The man of no particular fire.

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The common man will never understand the fire of a Maupassant…and his girlfriend will quietly despise him.

Some men believe that greatness is their destiny; others laugh at the concept. Some burn with a dangerous flame of desire; others are a lukewarm stove. Some are always dreaming about the apex of a Mount Everest; others are stupidly staring at a traffic jam.

To quote Thomas Carlyle: “History is the Biography of Great Men.” And Maupassant is a man whose biography belongs in the list of GREAT MEN.

*On a side note, it should be said that women despise the common man. His broken dreams, his insecure back peddling, his petty anger, etc. They secretly wish that he would dissipate…fade away into the distance. And that, in his place, a GREAT MAN would emerge – a man ready to carry her off into the heroic distance.

See related article: The Nice Man is Not a Great Man

5 thoughts on “I Entered Literary Life as a Meteor, and I Shall Leave it Like a Thunderbolt

  1. In the process of looking for your piece on dissolved marriage, xxI found this, so until the former’s time, it will do to comment on this.

    In fairness to the common man, it is not easy being Great, and it is quite beyond his capabilities. To ask of him the same we ask of the talented is like asking a 77-year-old man with vision problems to enter the Indianopolis 500 and beat the competition. Great Men are in a class of their own and, although they of course should get all the perks and accolades and fuck-possibilities (among other things, including decision-making authority), they should not be the hallmark with which ordinary Joes are compared. If you are going to have a society that is majority-beta, some accommodation must of necessity be made to allow for their varied deficiencies, including their broad-based fear and their lack of insight. It would be interesting, however, to see a society of full alphas, and only alphas.

    By the way, xxI read your piece on Twain, and agree with its fundamental precepts and assessments. Twain exhibited that unheralded American genius for common-talk, which can often carry more meaning and depth than anal commentary such as xxmy post today has. By using clear symbology and no-nonsense urban legends, we can cut through the thickets of obfuscation (such as xxI am inadvertently doing now) and approach a kind of stylistic perfection — not the only type of perfection, but an equally valid one.

    1. “Great Men are in a class of their own and, although they of course should get all the perks and accolades and fuck-possibilities (among other things, including decision-making authority), they should not be the hallmark with which ordinary Joes are compared.”

      Well said. Never mix the common with the elite.

    2. “By using clear symbology and no-nonsense urban legends, we can cut through the thickets of obfuscation”

      That’s probably why he has been somewhat cast aside by the global elites.

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