I’ve always been a fan of David Gilmour. When it comes to music, tone is everything. And Gilmour’s tone – both on guitar and vocals – is fantastic. An example of his skill is the solo album, About Face.

In particular, I like “Love on the Air”. Vocally, it has the signature tone of Gilmour: warm and pleasing. And musically, it’s a good example of how to build tension in a song. For example, we get the acoustic guitar first; that’s a good choice, because it’s an effective contrast to the electric guitar that follows.┬áThe same theory is applied to the pacing; we get a slower beat in the first part of the song, which makes the latter half more effective when he increases the beats-per-minute.

Faster tones work better when they’re preceded by slower ones. It’s a technique that’s lost on the younger musician; for example, the novice will start a song at a faster pace. He tries to accomplish everything immediately. To use a sexual metaphor, he wants to “blow his load” early on. There’s no foreplay…just an immediate ejaculation. So the chorus is not surprising in any way: all the excitement has already been used up.

Have a listen to the wonderful song…it’s a good piece of writing:

See Related Article: How Woodstock Was Used to Destroy the Traditions of America

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