Three Books That I’ve Read in October

Three Books That I’ve Read in October

This month, Major Styles has read the following books:

All of these were great. With Richard Wagner, we read about a man that rose into greatness: how he overcame a myriad of obstacles on his journey. With PT Barnum, we get advice on financial matters – how to increase your wealth and, subsequently, your life.  And with Marcus Aurelius, we read about the worldview of a famous Roman leader: and we find how his theories are closely related to Buddhism.

What are you reading this month?

See Related Article: Three Books That I’ve read in September

Concert Review: Widespread Panic in Las Vegas, Nevada (Saturday, October 27th)

Concert Review: Widespread Panic in Las Vegas, Nevada (Saturday, October 27th)

The Major saw Widespread Panic on Saturday night. The concert took place at the Park Theater in the Monte Carlo casino. It’s a beautiful arena, perfectly situated next to the T-Mobile Center and the Strip.

For many years, Widespread Panic has been on my radar.  I like the Grateful Dead (saw them many times) and WP operates in that same milieu: i.e. the “jam” band. So I finally got around to checking them out.

Here was my impression of the show:

The Positives: Instrumentation, Performance and Atmosphere

In terms of sound, Widespread Panic is great. The instruments have a wonderful tone: great bass, guitars, drums, etc. Long story short, they rock. The volume was loud but not too loud. Everybody was dancing at it was a fun time. Positive energy was dominant throughout the night.

DS
Widespread Panic has a great live sound. They can jam with the best of ’em!

The Negatives: Lyrics and Vocals

Lyrically, the band is average at best. They have no soaring melodies, no catchy hooks, etc. And the singer (John Bell) does not enunciate. When a singer is not proud of his lyrics, then he’s not going to belt them out. That situation applies to John Bell. His vocal tone is also average. It’s ok, but not very unique or compelling.

JB
John Bell: A good rhythm player, but he’s a mediocre lyricist and singer.

Summary

If you’re looking for a good time, Widespread Panic will get the job done. You’ll find a festive show and you’ll dance the night away. But don’t be surprised if, after the concert, something feels missing. You won’t be whistling their songs or singing their lyrics.

In short, great musicians….mediocre songwriters.

See Related Article: On the Greatness of John Fogerty

On the Beauty of “A Song for Sleeping” by Stone Temple Pilots

On the Beauty of “A Song for Sleeping” by Stone Temple Pilots

The Stone Temple Pilots had a wonderful song entitled “A Song for Sleeping”. It’s a song that Scott Weiland wrote for his son. Even if you’re not a fan of the band, take a listen. This song will speak to your heart because it elevates HUMAN BEAUTY and it affirms a UNIVERSAL LIFE ESSENCE:

Such a wonderful arrangement. The music elevates the lyrical content, allowing us to float into another world. We’re taken into the Weiland universe…we see the love that a father has for his son.

Take a closer look at the lyrics and listen to the song again:

Finally I’ve met you, the day has come  

You’re more than beautiful
And you’re my son

I don’t deserve this
I never thought it could be
Quite like the moment
When you first smiled at me
A toothless, wonderful feeling
Like I’d never seen

It’s you, Noah, it’s you 
And when you lie down to sleep
I’ll protect you
From the demons of the night
While I’m watching you grow

I’ll pray
There’s so much I could teach you
If you only have the time
Pray
There’s so much God can teach you
If you only have the time

So will you tell me the little things?
What does God look like?
And angels’ wings?
I don’t remember these things
So would you teach them to me?
So for the moment 
I’ll watch you breathe

And when you wake up in the morning 
And I pour the coffee
You’re always smiling sweetly

Art is the affirmation of the natural…a celebration of the beautiful. “A Song for Sleeping” is a good example of this. It speaks to the humanity in all of us…it raises our spirits into an ethereal plane.

Note: A nation cannot rise without a culture of NOBILITY. It must affirm the passionate rivers of CREATIVITY and BEAUTY. It must proclaim that life is to be celebrated. That human passion and natural wonders are the epicenter of spiritual bliss.

See Related Article: You Should Preference the Man That Retains a Vital Force

Crime and Punishment or The Brothers Karamazov?

Crime and Punishment or The Brothers Karamazov?

My vote goes to Crime and Punishment. The main reason is the simplicity and beauty of the plot. We have a central character—he commits a crime in the heat of passion, and then he spends the rest of the novel contemplating the ramifications of his action. During that time, the novel covers the fundamental topics of life: justice, mortality, good, evil, etc.

The Brothers Karamazov is complex in structure. It’s narrates the history of an entire family as opposed to one person. So it’s easy to become lost during the story, trying to remember what happened to which character. You almost need an Excel spreadsheet to follow along. It has some nice moments, for sure (The Grand Inquisitor” chapter being the most famous). But the reader has to work for these gems.

In my opinion, less is more. So if you have to chose one of Dostoevsky’s novels to begin with, make it Crime and Punishment. You’ll find it straightforward and beautifully written.

See Related Article: Short Story Review: “The Lake” by Ray Bradbury

Ain’t No Sunshine When He’s Gone

Ain’t No Sunshine When He’s Gone

I was driving today when I heard the song “Ain’t No Sunshine When She’s Gone.” Like so many romantic songs, the idea is nice. We feel a tingle. We reflect on romantic love. We reminisce on the feminine.

And yet, the opposite is true.

There ain’t no sunshine when a man is gone. Why is that? Because patriarchal headship is the foundation of FAMILY. It’s the buttress of HUMANITY. The husband is a promontory cliff, protecting his family from the vicissitudes of life.

So when a father absent, we find darkness. The energy of woman has nothing to cling to. So her life is a struggle, always in search of a masculine counterpart. And only this headship can lead her into a light.

There ain’t no sunshine when he’s gone.

See Related Article: Your Personal Victories Come First

Album Recommendation: “Man Child” by Herbie Hancock

Album Recommendation: “Man Child” by Herbie Hancock

What makes Herbie Hancock a GREAT MAN? Simply put, his music is capturing a universal life essence. We hear the “IT” factor – a musician that’s working in the sticky resin of humanity. Some people call it “funk,” because everything needs a category. But it’s deeper that that. His music is emanating from the epicenter of a great soul.

We’ll need more of this music in the future. Great civilizations are noted for their culture: art, music, architecture, etc. Money is not enough. The nation needs a noble art form…a spiritual force that ripples throughout the country.

See Related Article: What’s the Best Album Cover in Music History?

 

Christopher Hitchens on the Death of One’s Younger Self

Christopher Hitchens on the Death of One’s Younger Self

Christopher Hitchens had a wonderful excerpt about killing one’s younger self. Hitchens talked about how he was a Marxist as a young man. However, as he grew older, he came to realize the foolishness of his early beliefs. Instead of clinging to a lie, he discarded the previous idea so that he could grow as an intellectual.

Most people undergo a similar transformation. At some point, they realize that their ideologies were naive. The healthy response is to shrug it off with a laugh: to file it away as a youthful indiscretion. And yet, some people are unable to do so. They cling to a previous illusion, unable to break free. They become like the prisoners in Plato’s cave…chained to the wall of ignorance.

One such example is love. Most people grow up with an idealism that’s been cemented in a thousand Peter Cetera songs: “I am a man that will fight for your honor….”. They daydream about a future that’s been molded by these romantic fantasies. And then when they turn 40, this dream is usually unfulfilled. They feel like a failure. Rather than analyze the previous position, they become bitter about the prize they never received. They hate men, they hate women, etc.

Invariably, they fail to realize something – their initial position was based upon a lie. Their was no grand Wizard of Oz; there was only a charlatan behind a curtain. Their future happiness depends on the acceptance of that fact.

The human existence is like that of snake. We have to continually to shed our skin in order to grown.

See Related Article: Essay Review: “The Turning Point of My Life” by Mark Twain