Six Interesting Quotes From “The Maxims of George Washington”

Six Interesting Quotes From “The Maxims of George Washington”

I finished reading The Maxims of George Washington awhile back. It’s a collection of insights from America’s first president. The book was fascinating, since so much is said about the man. And yet, we’ve rarely heard anything from the man.

Below are six interesting quotes from the book:

On the Native Americans (Indian Nations):

“The basis of our proceedings with the Indian Nations has been, and shall be, JUSTICE, during the period in which I have anything to do with the administration of this government” (p. 204)

On friendship:

“The company in which you will improve most will be the least expensive to you.” (263).

“Assimilate with men of good quality, if you esteem your own reputation; for it is better to be alone than in bad company.” (264)

On his feelings towards Great Britain:

I was opposed to the policy of Great Britain, and became an enemy of her measures; but I always distinguish between a cause and individuals…personally I could never be an enemy to them.”(p. 265).

On slavery:

“There is not a man living, who wishes more sincerely than I do, to see a plan adopted, for the abolition of it [slavery]. But there is only one proper and effectual mode by which it can be accomplished, and that is, by legislative authority.”

Your [Lafayette’s] purchase of an estate in Cayenne, with a view of emancipating the slaves on it, is a generous and noble proof of your humanity” (p. 276).

On gambling:

“Avoid gaming. This is a vice that is productive of every possible evil” (331)

Primary sources are better than secondary ones. Therefore, it should be the goal of every honest man to judge others by their actual words…as opposed to what others have said about them.

See Related Article: You Should Preference the Man That Retains a Vital Force 

 

Three Books That I’ve Read in September

Three Books That I’ve Read in September

This September, I’ve read the following books:

Going forward, my goal is to read at least one autobiography a month. As an English major, I read a lot of fiction. It expanded my creativity but destroyed my reason. I saw the world as a fictional play. And I was ignorant about the events in life – the people that created the world around me. So I’m looking to destroy my previous illusions.

Secondary sources are usually biased. We hear things about people that are, by and large, a load of bullshit. Therefore, it’s important to separate fact and fiction. Reading autobiographies is a great way to decipher the timeline of history for oneself.

See Related Article: Short Story Review: “The Lake” by Ray Bradbury”