The Musician is Both a God and a Nobody

The Musician is Both a God and a Nobody

The irony of the musician…

On one hand, he’s a God. When he plays the guitar, the crowd is under a spell. He’s a magician, a sorcerer; the people, connected to his guitar strings. His voice a taming laser. He’s the puppeteer, making them dance at will. A holy man of amplified sound. He can transcend the mundane, taking us to the astral plane.

On the other hand, he’s a nobody. When he plays the guitar, he builds nothing. He’s below the plumber, the mechanic. His music, dying in the air. His works are transitory. He’s a clown, put here for the public amusement. A court jester. The surgeon, the architect, the scientist…all more valuable than a musician.

Every coin has two sides.

The Memory Will Never Die

The Memory Will Never Die

A beautiful song by Default…it captures the moments we all have. The desire to hold onto moments, to not forget, to remain in the arms of a perfect bliss. Your family, your friends, the times that you were elevated into a higher plane.

Sometimes, only music can capture the summit of a man’s emotions.

The Memory Will Never Die Video

I whisper in your ear
The words you want to hear
You fell the wind and it reminds you
It happens every time
You stop and close your eyes
You can’t deny what lives inside you
Well I know it’s all to see
What is meant to be
When yesterday’s so far behind you

Deep inside your soul though
I’m always there

You made me believe
The day you surrendered to me
The memory will never die
The love that you gave
I’ll never throw it away
The memory will never die

The tides take a turn
Another lesson learned
I’m right here but still you wonder
But you say you need more
And it’s not what it was before
Your on your own and going under

Deep inside your soul though
I’m always there

You made be believe
The day you surrendered to me
The memory will never die
The love that you gave
I’ll never throw it away
The memory will never die

Whenever you wake up
Remember you gave up
All that you had from nothing at all
The bed that you lay in
Remember you made it
And nobody’s there to catch you when you fall

You made be believe
The day you surrendered to me
The memory will never die

The love that you gave
I’ll never throw it away
The memory will never die
You made me believe
The day you surrendered to me
The memory will never die
The love that you gave
I’ll never throw it away
The memory will never die

Read more: Default – The Memory Will Never Die Lyrics | MetroLyrics

Timing is the Bedrock of Music

Timing is the Bedrock of Music

The most important aspect of musicianship is timing—you either have it or you don’t. This goes for all instruments: drums, guitar, etc. If you don’t have timing, then you won’t get far in music. You’ll never shine brightly. And more specifically, you’ll always struggle when performing with other musicians. Your jams will be disjointed, confusing, and lacking in magic.

I’ve seen hundreds of musicians over the years. And I’ve learned that there is something inherent to a sense of rhythm. It’s something in your bones: you feel the music, it bleeds through you. You lock into the drums and bass inherently. You don’t need to think about counting, since you count without thinking. You strum in synchronicity with the cosmos, directly connected with the Gods of Music. You are a conduit for the Great Wave of Sound.

sunset_guitarist_by_arvydasv-d5u0m9d
Timing should come natural to the musician

If you need a metronome, then you’re not a musician. When a music teacher senses that a student is having trouble with timing, he’ll send him home with a metronome. But this is usually not effective. It’s like teaching somebody with two left feet to dance. It’s like teaching a stuttering person how to speak publicly. In short, the student is not a natural. It’s like when Elton John tried to marry that woman—it sounded good on paper, but it was a failed experiment at the end of the day.

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Great musicians do not rely on  machines for timing (unless they are recording)

The one exception to this metronome solution is in the recording studio. It’s necessary to use a metronome in this setting, since recordings must be perfect. But the dynamics of a studio are different than a live performance.

In life, it’s best to focus on your strengths. The sooner you do this, the better. So if you have a poor sense of timing, then it’s best to focus on something other than music. There are millions of possibilities, and your true calling is lying in another place.

Song Review: “On the Turning Away” by Pink Floyd

Song Review: “On the Turning Away” by Pink Floyd

I’ve been reflecting on a Pink Floyd song lately: “On The Turning Away.” It’s a song that moved me as a teenager—a song that encourages global unity, world peace and universal brotherhood. It champions the Weltanschauung of the 1960s, reminding us about the importance of social protest.

Now, years later, I see the song in a negative light. It’s now an idealistic fantasy, a pipe dream of liberal poppycock.

On the turning away
From the pale and downtrodden
And the words they say
Which we won’t understand

Some people deserve our help; others don’t. Most people that pretend to be “downtrodden” are really hucksters, predators on the prowl: male feminists, confidence men, lying seductresses, etc. They wear the coat of nobility, but it’s merely an affectation—a showy pretense. They are selfish people.

“Don’t accept that what’s happening
Is just a case of others’ suffering
Or you’ll find that you’re joining in
The turning away”

Not everybody is “suffering.” In the United States, we’re assaulted by a 24/7 Grievance Industry: sexism, racism, homophobia (rinse and repeat). Most of these people are not really suffering—they’re attention whores with first-world problems. Their incessant yammering is an attempt to deceive the public. And it pulls our attention away from doing real honorable deeds: helping children with cerebral palsy, for example.

It’s a sin that somehow
Light is changing to shadow
And casting it’s shroud
Over all we have known

That’s true. And most of “light changing to shadow” comes from the foul mouth of left-wing anarchists. They proclaim themselves to be open-minded, but they insult others, destroy property, riot, etc.

Unaware how the ranks have grown
Driven on by a heart of stone
We could find that we’re all alone
In the dream of the proud

Actually, a “heart of stone” is a good thing—at least at first. There are so many snakes in the grass that one must be careful. People should earn your trust. They need to win the right to enter the secret confines of your heart. Would you tell your teenage daughter to trust everyone, or would you tell her to be careful? Think about it.

On the wings of the night
As the daytime is stirring
Where the speechless unite
In a silent accord

Sounds like a Million Woman March. And by the way, what were they marching about again?

Using words you will find are strange
And mesmerized as they light the flame
Feel the new wind of change
On the wings of the night

I think that cisgendered and pansexual officially qualify as “words you will find are strange.”

No more turning away
From the weak and the weary
No more turning away
From the coldness inside

I will have to “turn away” if the order-through-chaos media continues to assault me with Cultural Marxism. I have to watch my blood pressure, making sure it does not spike to unhealthy levels.

Just a world that we all must share
It’s not enough just to stand and stare
Is it only a dream that there’ll be
No more turning away?

Yes, there will be a “turning away”—from a mainstream media that feeds the public with lies. From cheap philosophies that lead to disillusion and chaos. From “feel good” mantras that are empty platitudes. From a failure to mentor the young with profitable advice.

I’m a bit sad today. It sucks to know that a song I thoroughly enjoyed is now a joke to me (at least lyrically).  I feel like Dorothy in The Wizard of Oz when she find out that there is no magical wizard—just an old charlatan hiding behind a curtain.